A trade journal of a still-emerging field, written by Adam Tinworth.

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I’ve just noticed that the recently overhauled e-mail link on the sidebar wasn’t working right. It is now. So, if you want to get in contact, you can.

Sorry about that.

I’d fire my webmaster but, frankly, he’s me.


Originally uploaded by telegraph_media_group.

Shane Richmond, while avoiding responding to Antony’s post mentioned earlier, has unveiled something rather special: My Telegraph.

And very interesting it looks too. As described, it’s both a place to blog yourself and to gather stories from the paper. A workspace? A social network? A bit of both? From the looks of the pics on Flickr it resembles a blog-centric social network, like Vox. But Shane’s not giving too many details.

It certainly has the makings of a significant expansion of a major national newspaper into the user-generated content field, although the legal ramifications of all this blogging under the Telegraph’s name must have given them pause for thought.

But, worries aside, it could also be the idea that triggers mainstream adoption of blogging by the British public. And that’s pretty damn exciting.

The Media Guardian had a look at the Digital Doorstepping issue on Monday. (I’m reliably informed that doorstepping is the act of going house to house in serach of reaction, doorstopping is where you’re getting to the point of physically stopping somebody shutting the door.) The article is, unsurprisingly, somewhat ambivalent about the whole issue.

However, a comment Jackie left on Antony’s blog highlighted just how insensitive and intrusive it can be:

What’s chilling is how journos are staking out Facebook and starting ‘tribute’ groups to victims as soon as something like this happens. I saw this firsthand when English teacher Lindsay Hawker was murdered in Japan a few weeks ago: I was invited to one of those groups, joined, and was suddenly inundated with journo requests from Closer magazine and others, who thought I was a friend of the girl’s and wanted a tell-all interview for their own ‘tasteful tributes’. You can imagine my response to the journalists.

Yes, I can.

The Washington Post has published an interesting article by a law professor about students attending classes with laptops open. It calls into question the idea that the younger generation are as able to multi-task and process as many information sources as we think they can.

Is he being reactionary, or is this going to be a genuine problem?

Ironically, I’m typing this in an internal meeting with my attention on 50% on the proceedings.

[Via a comment on Anil’s Vox.]

I’ve been called away from the urban delights of London Town to the rural idyll of Suffolk on family business, so my account of the Lewisham Bloggers Drinks last Friday will have to wait until tomorrow. My fine photographs of the event are on my iMac in the flat.

However, it it with heavy heart that I report that it was only the second most important bloggy gathering in London over the weekend.

Those satirical slanderers of stagecraft, the West End Whingers, held a party for assorted thesps, writers and bloggers, and had a fine time of it all.

Bet they didn’t have any Adnams, though.

(We really should have a blogging journalists’ drinks at some point)

It’s been a hectic weekend – no time for blogging.

However, now John & Anita are safely wed, the Lewisham Bloggers Drinks have been drunk and various friends visited, I’ll catch up on blog stuff.

But first: sleep.