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A trade journal of a still-emerging field, written by Adam Tinworth.

Movable Type 6 logo

I’ve just done what I suspect will be the last major upgrade to the Movable Type system I use to run this blog. While MT itself seems to march along merrily, it’s clearly targeting large commercial users (I paid for the software upgrade that I’ve just installed), and I’m ready to jump ship to something else.

That said, having taken a long look at migrating to WordPress, I’ve decided to hold fire for a little while, to see how Ghost comes along – its 1.0 release is a way away yet. If I end up going to that system, then I’d rather only do one migration, and its focus on Markdown looks handy, given that I mostly blog using that at the moment.

Movable Type 6 (which is what I’ve just installed) is the fifth version of MT I’ve used, since I switched from Blogger a very long time ago…

  • http://www.seoskeptic.com/ Aaron Bradley

    For what it’s worth, my two cents (or two pence) worth of advice is that the benefits of employing a widely-used and supported platform as often as not outweigh the seemingly objective superiority of this or that feature, or even of the platform as a whole. So however Ghost does or doesn’t shape up, the chance that it will eclipse WordPress as a blogging (or even general purpose publishing platform) are virtually nil, and there’s a better-than-average chance that in a few years time it won’t exist at all.

    Not to mention the heavy lifting you’re almost certainly going to have to go through migrating to Ghost, whereas the migration to WordPress is supported by multiple plugins and exhaustive documentation.

    All of this to say that I’d bite the bullet – WordPress ho! But if you go Ghost and it doesn’t work out … there’s always Typepad. 😉

    • http://www.onemanandhisblog.com Adam Tinworth

      And yet the wheel does turn. When I started on MT WordPress didn’t exist, and Movable Type was the dominant platform.