Home » Archives for July 2010

Month: July 2010

Good News/Bad News from KPMG

The Bad:

KPMG has found that 81% of UK “would go elsewhere for content if a previously free site we use frequently began charging”. Only 19% would be willing to pay in the UK, while globally (the same research looked at consumer behaviour in a range of countries) 43% of consumers are willing to pay for digital content.

Retrofitting a paywall? Probably not gonna work.

The Good:

They are also more willing to have data collected if it would result in lower content costs. “48 percent of UK consumers would be willing to accept profile tracking, up from 35 percent in the 2008 survey.” Publishers and marketers need to take care though as 90% of consumers also expressed concern about their privacy and security online.

Interesting possibilities there, especially in niches, if explored with care…

The quotes above are both from Kevin Anderson’s rather deeper analysis, which is well worth reading.

Enhanced by Zemanta

A Few Slightly Geeky Journo Links

Time for some links:

  • One of the most consistent themes I hear when talking to journalists around the country is frustration with the web publishing CMS they have to deal with (especially if they’ve ever used any blog platform). In that light, this post about the BBC’s new web CMS makes for fascinating reading, both through what they’re doing and through the fact they blogged about it publically. I suspect that a culture that allows such blogging is laikely to produce a better piece of kit…
  • Another trend I see amongst some journalists is an almost obsessive pride in not understanding technology. Kevin makes an interesting case for a more data-centric view of journalism that should give pause to such folks.
  • Martin’s look at how well (or more often, not) digital coverage of the World Cup has survived down the years is thought-provoking. There’s a surprising amount of value in them there archives…
  • And Nature’s using OpenSocial. I’m very interested in this, and you’re probably not, but it’s my blog so “nyah”.

About that iPad mag subscriptions panic

photo (1)I saw a lot of buzz overnight about Apple not allowing magazine subscriptions on the iPad, and OMG how is the iPad going to save us now? Steve, you have betrayed us!

Except, well, that’s simply not true. You can buy subscriptions to publications on the iPad – I have ones to The Times, The Spectator and a photography magazine. There are various routes for selling those subscriptions, and one that’s specifically disallowed. Here’s John Gruber to explain:

Here’s the difference, I think. With Amazon and the Wall Street Journal, users set up and create their accounts on the web, not within the iOS apps. The WSJ app requires a subscription that doesn’t go through iTunes, but you create, pay for, and manage that subscription on the web. Judging from Kafka’s description of the Sports Illustrated situation, it sounds like Time tried to add its own direct billing subscription system within the Sports Illustrated app itself.

Gruber makes the very valid point that all this OMG! PANIC! would go away if Apple would just clarify its rules, though…

Enhanced by Zemanta

The Future of Newspapers (via Spider-Man)

When I was growing up, my understanding of who and what journalists actually were was largely defined by the staff of the Daily Bugle, employer of Peter Parker, better known as the Amazing Spider-Man. In particular, they were defined by this chap, the infamous J. Jonah Jameson

J Jonah Jameson
Now, despite then lure of the Marvel Comics app on the iPad, I’m not much of a comics reader these days. But this news from the creators of the current Spider-Man comics should be enough to send a chill down our collective spines: 

In the Spidey-verse, I think one of our best ideas was making Jonah mayor. The possibilities of that remain endless, and with newspapers dying, it was a terrific way to give him a powerful presence.

It’s the off-hand way that a creator from another branch of the publishing business dismisses the future of our industry that stands out to me – they think that newspapers are now so unimportant that the character doesn’t carry the same weight as an editor as he once did…

Enhanced by Zemanta

Shooting Video on a DSLR

I spent a chunk of the weekend editing 30 minutes of holiday video footage down to a nice, tight 10 minutes that went down a storm with the family. And that reminded me of several experiments I've wanted to conduct with video for a while, and a few extra ones that crossed my mind while chatting with Documentally when he came to speak at RBI.

So, I pulled some experimental video I shot on my Canon EOS500D DSLR (an enthusiast level camera, available for around £500) out of Aperture, and edited it up. It was shot hand-held, with some image stabilization applied in iMovie during the editing process: 
And...I'm quietly impressed by it. The quality is pretty good (as you'd expect with a decent lens on the front), and it's actually easier to handhold than some of the Flip-style cameras, because it's easy to get two hands on it. One shot near the end betrays how difficult it is to handhold at the further end of a telephoto zoom. With a tripod, you could get some really nice footage off this thing. 
Room for more experimentation, I think. 
There's a YouTube version after the jump, for those of you on iPads and their ilk...
Enhanced by Zemanta

Read more