Home » Archives for September 2011

Month: September 2011

Facebook’s Timeline: Cool or Creepy?

OK, I really can’t decide if Facebook’s new Timeline approach to profiles is cool or creepy:


On the one hand, it’s a cool visualisation of who you are. On the other, it really feels like your life laid bare. I wonder how granular the privacy controls will be over the different sections of the Timeline? And do I really want a single company knowing this much about my life?

And, although this may seem morbid, I wonder if they’ve thought through how to deal with the inevitable end of the timeline: death?

How little things change…

Quoting myself, from nearly eight years ago:

Everyone is entitled to an opinion, true enough. What most people fail to realise is that they are not entitled to have that opinion taken seriously. The ability to bash out a few hundred barely coherent words and post them on the internet does not automatically make your opinion worthy. That respect has to be earned.

Still a useful things to bear in mind when interacting on the internet…

Vimeo is selling you music for your videos

Well, this is really useful:

I was hunting for some music for a video project the other day, and struggled to find reasonably-priced selections of tracks to be used in that sort of context. Given the boom in popularity in online video in recent years, I was genuinely surprised there wasn’t something like the Vimeo Music Store. But now there is. Given that I’ve utterly exhausted the possibilities of the music that ships with iMovie, I suspect I’ll be digging into this store a fair amount.

Another (useful) media metaphor

A predictably insightful and inspiring post from Mr Mayfield:

It occurs to me that media and marketing businesses are like the master craftsmen of old. Master masons in the middle ages created cathedrals and castles of staggering scale and beauty. 
When science – and especially mathematics – began to make its influence felt more, though, a whole new world of possibilities opened up – what we think of as the modern discipline of architecture. Projects of scale and ambition were led by architects.

Architects brought together science and the art.
That’s not to say that master masons wouldn’t and didn’t have a future – but it was a future within the context of architecture as a discipline, as a world view.

I’ve felt for a long time that the future of media will look very different from even its recent past. This is more grist to the mill.