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A trade journal of a still-emerging field, written by Adam Tinworth.

Posts from the Comics Category

Berkeley Breathed on the reaction to his return to Bloom County:

“There is no media that will allow a Charlie Brown or a Snoopy to become a universal and shared joy each morning at the same moment across the country,” Breathed continues. “Maybe the rather marked response to my character’s return is a reflection of that loss. A last gasp of a passing era.”

It’s an interesting observation – merely weeks after Apple has tried to resurrect that shared media moment with the arrival of Beats 1.

[hat-tip Matt]

Franklin's second appearance in Peanuts

What happened when Peanuts introduced a black kid?

I remember telling Larry at the time about Franklin—he wanted me to change it, and we talked about it for a long while on the phone, and I finally sighed and said, “Well, Larry, let’s put it this way: Either you print it just the way I draw it or I quit. How’s that?”

A fascinating story of how one woman persuaded Charles Schultz to add a black kid to the classic comic series, that shows how much difference even a small artistic stand can have on starting to reshape cultures.

What would today’s equivalent be?

[via Kottke]

Ms marvel fanfic fan

Here’s something else from outside the mainstream of publishing you might find interesting:

Ms Marvel recently went to its sixth printing, a rare accomplishment in comics today.

But chatting with Marvel executives at San Diego Comic Con I discovered more. That it sells more in digital than print, and that includes the first issue.

That’s a new Marvel comic selling more through their app than it is in print. What’s even more interesting is that the new Ms Marvel is a brand new superhero – something that’s been very hard to launch successfully in recent decades – and one whose real identity is a young Muslim American teenage girl.

It’s also a bloody good, entertaining read. (The curious who like themselves a bit of print can pre-order the first Ms. Marvel collection from Amazon.)

So, here’s a traditional media company, shifting to digital – and by all indications, gaining a whole new audience with it. (Comics are growing in popularity amongst the young again – and females for the first time in a very long time – rather than being the preserve of ageing male fans…)

More like this, please.

Big Hammer
Mashable reports on a complete abuse of New York Comic Con attendees’ Twitter accounts:

Fans, celebrities and press attending New York Comic Con on Thursday sent out laudatory tweets expressing excitement to be at the annual convention — or at least it looked like they did, as the tweets were published entirely without their permission or knowledge.

What’s worse is that they don’t even seem particularly sorry they did it:

As you may have seen yesterday, there were some posts to Twitter and Facebook issued by New York Comic Con on behalf of attendees after RFID badges were registered. This was an opt-in function after signing in, but we were probably too enthusiastic in our messaging and eagerness to spread the good word about NYCC.

As the word spreads that social media can powerfully extend the reach of events like this, I’d lay good money on further abuses like this happening.

Photo by NY Big Apple and used under a Creative Commons licence

A scene from Bad Machinery

John Allison, who has a long history of excellent web comics behind him, on the role of Tumblr for content creators:

I would never decry any service as worthless. There are people who have caught mass attention via Tumblr, and sold great piles of things as a result. There’s a use for everything, and an exception to every rule. The exceptions are the reasons that others try. But Tumblr sets the bar of success incredibly low. The payout will almost always be zero. Not beer money, nothing.

Just because somewhere is the easy place to get attention doesn’t mean it’s the right place…

(One of John’s sketches made an appearance on this blog a long time ago…)

Scarygoround Asbo

This morning was brightened up by the arrival of Skellington, the latest print collection derived from the excellent web comic by John Allison, Scary-Go-Round.

The book is as delightful as one would expect from this talent guy. It’s a collection of strips from the web site, but with a pile of extras and some improvements to the originals that make it more a Director’s Cut DVD than anything else. However, I was just about to chuck the envelope away when I spotted a little sketch Mr Allison had done on the back, which I’ve reproduced above.

He has a knack of making you me feel very good about buying his stuff, and this is the sort of lovely little touch that creates that feel.

Nice work, sir.