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A trade journal of a still-emerging field, written by Adam Tinworth.

Posts from the Media Category

David Remnick writing for the New Yorker about Trump’s meeting the the US press:

“But he truly doesn’t seem to understand the First Amendment,” the source continued. “He doesn’t. He thinks we are supposed to say what he says and that’s it.”

Trump’s experience is as a CEO, not a political leader. Sounds like he’s treating the country as a company, and expecting the press to be his comms department. That’s not how it works.

But there’s something more fundamental at work here, too. Trump’s presidency will almost certainly make a pause in political access journalism, because he much prefers speaking direct.

Obama paved the way here – he understood the role of social media in crafting and spreading his image. But Trump takes it a step further, using social media both as a comms tool, and as a distraction:

But what happens if the president intentionally misdirects the media by taking about trivialities?

I suspect, unless the US media unlearns its habit of reaction in a pavlovian manner to each outrageous Tweet from the president-elect, that we’re about to find out.

This piece on hyperpartisan Facebook pages, from Buzzfeed, becomes even more compelling in the light of today’s news:

Our analysis of three hyperpartisan right-wing Facebook pages found that 38% of all posts were either a mixture of true and false or mostly false, compared to 19% of posts from three hyperpartisan left-wing pages that were either a mixture of true and false or mostly false. The right-wing pages are among the forces — perhaps as potent as the cable news shows that have gotten far more attention — that helped fuel the rise of Donald Trump.

Media’s failure to truly engage with the social spread of news has opened the door to a new form of media, once that lacks the journalistic ethics that our polity badly needs right now.

The rise, commercialisation, fall and rebirth of fashion blogging:

“Because there was a period of time where fashion bloggers became quite monotonous…now we’re seeing individuals come through, but on social media as opposed to a web-based platform,” observes Lau. “It’s almost like the big fashion bloggers have become ‘establishment’ and people on Instagram or Vine stars are doing their own thing.”

A fascinating picture of an industry in a process of continuos re-invention.

Berkeley Breathed on the reaction to his return to Bloom County:

“There is no media that will allow a Charlie Brown or a Snoopy to become a universal and shared joy each morning at the same moment across the country,” Breathed continues. “Maybe the rather marked response to my character’s return is a reflection of that loss. A last gasp of a passing era.”

It’s an interesting observation – merely weeks after Apple has tried to resurrect that shared media moment with the arrival of Beats 1.

[hat-tip Matt]

Some Doctor Who fans choose to embrace the 10th anniversary of the revived series by doing something creative like this:

Others choose to get all upset that a journalist (and Who fan) dared write something taking the mickey out of the show’s, err, weaker moments:

It lacks integrity. Perhaps Martin Belam would like to remind himself of the meaning of that word. It certainly doesn’t apply to selling out on your favourite TV show (his Twitter account page loves the soulless Cybermen) for a few quid.

It’s about ethics in Doctor Who journalism apparently.

This was my contribution to the festivities.

My eight-year old, Who-obsessed self would be so very proud.

Michelle Phan - photo by Gage Skidmore

A music label is suing YouTube star Michelle Phan for using its music:

The label and its publishing arm claim she has used about 50 of their songs without permission in her YouTube videos and on her own website.

She disputes this, claiming that they gave permission – and interestingly, one of the artists involved has come out in support of her:

What’s more interesting to me is that Phan is one of a breed of new media entrepreneurs that have flown under many media commentators’ radar. In fact, I first became aware of her while sat in a cab from Manhattan to JFK, with a screen on auto-play in front of me. Periodically adverts for YouTube would come up, featuring some of their biggest celebrities. I passed through disinterest to annoyance, and out into curiosity, as the traffic crawled its way towards the airport. Who were these people? Why was YouTube paying to advertise them and itself?

This is the one starring Phan:

When I got back to the UK, I started poking at this, and whole world opened up to me. These are not just social media celebrities, but powerful media businesses, producing content with a tight focus on their enthusiast audience. They’re doing all the things that media businesses claim to be doing – and doing them better.

These video entrepreneurs have built huge followings on YouTube – in Phan’s case, through make-up tutorials – and that leveraged that to build real businesses from that following. In a sense, Phan has become a one woman beauty magazine, and is another example of why so many consumer magazines have struggled to get traction online. What they do – offer information to enthusiasts – is being replaced by utterly different forms of media.

The WSJ did an interview with Phan recently, that almost explored how she’s built her online business, but gets a little distracted by talking about make-up:

In fact, she’s now big enough business that a record label wants $150,000 for every copyright infringement they can prove.

You know it’s big business when there are big lawsuits involved.

Photo by Gage Skidmore and used under a Creative Commons licence

Podcasts

Noted in an otherwise positive story about Matt Hill crowdfunding a rebooted Media Talk podcast:

Asked by Press Gazette last month whether The Guardian’s decision to axe Media Talk was an indication that podcasts have had their day, Hill said: “Actually I think we are seeing a resurgence in the medium.

I wonder if Press Gazette asks if magazines have had their day, every time they report on one closing? Not much evidence of it in the archives.

In which case – why the double standards on media type? It’s a strange old industry that will deny that very old media forms are under serious threat, but eagerly await any sniff of mortality in newer ones…

Eleven in the sky

This blog is eleven years old today.

But really, who cares on a day when:

It’s interesting tracking the relative ages of those things, though. BBC Three is less than a month older than this blog – it was launched on the 9th February 2003. While Metro newspaper dates back to 1999, the website appears to have launched in 2004 – making it younger than this blog. Flipboard and Zite are both whippersnappers, both around three years old.

So, I need to face it. This blog, while not even teenager, is old. But while it may be old, at least it has stamina…

(Can I just extend my sympathies to Kevin and John, both of whom are big Zite users, and both of whom are probably in mourning right now…)

Photo by Martin Snopek, and used under a Creative Commons licence