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A trade journal of a still-emerging field, written by Adam Tinworth.

Posts from the Personal Category

UK mainstream media innovators to watch

From a Fipp interview on longform and explainer journalism, as well as media innovation in traditional publishers:

Perhaps I’m too close to the subject matter, but I struggle to see any media brands as inherently innovative. I see some teams doing innovative work – the FT’s interactive team under Martin Stabe, Sarah Marshall is doing interesting things since she went to the WSJ, and The Times’s digital development team, for example. I’m looking forward to seeing what The Telegraph’s new formats team do under Rich Moynihan and Malcolm Coles.

And the interviewee is…? Uh, me. This is an interview I did back in the summer, and had completely forgotten to link to until now…

It started with a tweet.

Actually, that’s not quite true, but it makes a good opening line, so what the hell.

And the tweet looked like this:

One of my New Year “to-do”s – I don’t do resolutions – was to sort out and professionalise some aspects of my business. Now that it looks like I’m staying self-employed for the foreseeable future, I need to both upgrade my business admin (tax return done today!) and my online persona. For example, a set of pages on here describing the services I offer would be a good idea, wouldn’t they?

And I really, really wanted some decent headshots of myself. I’ve been shot by professionals twice, and I’ve not liked the results either time. The whole process was too “production line”. There was no attempt to express me. I was just corporate drone #1138. And that phase of my life is done.

I’ve been using what are, in essence, a succession of jumped-up selfies. But that couldn’t – shouldn’t – last. But I was a little stumped as to where to find the right photographer to get me some images.

Now, my friends over at Brilliant Noise had some excellent headshots done by lomokev in Brighton, which I’d always quietly envied. His work is great – but not quite what I wanted. And everyone else I saw was doing the standard corporate headshot.

So, basically, I took the easiest option. I procrastinated.

Mounting the stairs, in search of headshots

And then I saw Kristina’s tweet. She’s an ex-student; I did a few workshops with her and her cohort on their online presence. Her website blew me away – for someone who’d been seriously into photography for less than a year, her command of light and form was remarkable. £60 seemed like a reasonable gamble for some decent headshots. And, honestly, I was curious to see how her work had come along in the 9 months or so since I last saw her.

And so, last Monday I found myself climbing some narrow, offensively carpeted steps above a shop, a short walk from Clapham Junction station, to have my portrait made in a studio converted out of a kitchen/diner area. And, as I stared at a serious piece of glass, hearing about her commission to go to Sri Lanka, while desperately trying to remember to keep my chin down, I came to the conclusion I had made the right decision.

And far from the only one to notice her talent. The Guardian ran a spread of her images recently.

Post-processed

The results? They are… pleasing.

Adam Tinworth - pensive mood

Adam Tinworth headshot

I’m busy rolling them out across my social presences – Facebook, Twitter, this site, Linkedin and Gravatar are done, and I’ll deal with others as I encounter them.

I’ve never really had a set of images I’ve been happy to send off for speaking gigs, or to go on course descriptions, or to accompany the occasion bits of writing elsewhere I do.

But now I do, and I’m very happy with them.

Thanks, Kristina.

Incisive Media plans on blocking ad-blockers in the New Year

The publisher, which has a mix of subscription-based and ad-funded magazines, is seeing 40 percent of its traffic affected by visitors with ad blockers enabled, across the titles with more technology-savvy audiences, with other titles such as subscription-based financial brand Risk, seeing 10-15 percent of traffic affected.

The ad-blocking arms race is officially underway.

This morning I am mainly questioning my life choices. I just received this through the post:

A box from Blizzard

What’s inside? Why, a statue to celebrate the fact I have been an unbroken subscriber to World of Warcraft for a decade:

The 10th anniversary of World of Warcraft statute

He’s staying on my desk – just to remind me to check that I’m making good decisions about what to do with my time…


Well, hello, blog. I’m sorry I’ve been neglecting you. I’ve been terribly busy, you see. We’re right in term time at City University, which always keeps me busy – but added to that, I’ve recently landed the biggest contract I’ve had since I went into consultancy, and it’s for one of our national newspapers. Time is at something of a premium.
Plus, my daughter has learnt to open doors and turn on light switches, which means that I’m currently woken by the bed lights going on at about 6.30, with a cheery 2 year old saying “sleeping time is over, Daddy”. And that’s the good mornings. On the bad ones, she’s affectionately poking me in the cheek. 
Little does she know that sleeping time ended when she was born.
So, writing in the evening is not exactly a great idea right now. 

But, the thing is, I promised myself I wouldn’t do this. I would not neglect the blog (and the networking) when I got busy. And sometimes I just have to write myself back into blogging.

And that’s exactly what this post is. 

Hello. Again. 

Morning Tom Foolery

I sometimes underestimate just how different the life I choose to live is. I can often work where I want – like the coffee shop I’m sat in right now. I have a lot of freedom to pick and choose the people I work with – and have taken satisfaction is severing ties with people who proved unpleasant as clients. I don’t have a boss, or a full-time job. My time is pretty much mine to manage, but that comes with choices. For example, I’ve just spent four solid days looking after my toddler daughter, picking up some of my wife’s days, so she can get a handle on her work as term really kicks in.

And I always, always, always underestimate how tired I’ll be after a day looking after that tiny bundle of explorative energy. “Oh, I’ll do some blogging and catch up on e-mail after she goes to bed,” I say. Hah.

rampaging-hazel-pop.jpg

And so I find myself tearing through a Tuesday, trying to catch up on the work I haven’t been able to do for over half a week. It’s at times like this that I almost – almost – feel like going and getting a proper job again. The eternal problem with working for yourself is that there’s no such thing – mentally, at least – as office hours. Your income is completely dependent on how much you work, and thus any time where you could work can lead to you feeling guilty for not doing so. Frankly, I’m the most demanding boss I’ve ever had.

And then I remember that little rampager, and remember she needs time with her parents far more than she needs more toys, and I try to settle down and live comfortably in the choices I’ve made.