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A trade journal of a still-emerging field, written by Adam Tinworth.

Posts from the Technology Category

MG Siegler on almost being able to switch full-time to his iPad – but not quite:

This is especially frustrating to me because I see glimpses of the computing future I could have. Tonight, for example, I brought only my iPad to a cafe to write this. I didn’t have to bring a big bag to lug my laptop. I just grabbed the iPad and walked out the door. The writing experience with the external keyboard cover for the iPad Pro is fantastic. No distractions.

But when I publish this post, I’ll still do so when I get home. From my laptop.

His argument is that the iPad is 90% of the way to being a laptop replacement – but that last 10% matters. I suspect there are a lot of people, myself included, in his position. We’d like to go iPad first (and maybe only) – but it’s not there yet.

Today’s security update for Apple’s iOS devices is a serious one:

One of the world’s most evasive digital arms dealers is believed to have been taking advantage of three security vulnerabilities in popular Apple products in its efforts to spy on dissidents and journalists.

(Emphasis mine.)

Basically, if you’re a journalist working for a national or international news organisation, update your iPhone or iPad as soon as you possibly can.

Using an iPad to prepare photos for the web

This article has me rethinking one of my core reasons for not using my iPad for more blogging:

I’ve pretty much stopped importing and editing images on my Mac. Though I didn’t expect it, the iPad provides me with an easier and quicker workflow for posting hero images on iMore than my Mac ever did.

Basically, while we were all looking elsewhere, the iPad got really good at moving files between applications. And, for some tasks, it’s now better than the Mac.

Tinder rates the desirability of its users with an algorithm

Tinder is judging you:

You might not realize it, but anyone who’s used the popular dating app is assigned an internal rating: a score calculated by the company that ranks the most (and least) desirable people swiping on the service. The scores are not available to the public, but Tinder recently granted me access to my own—and I’ve regretted learning it ever since.

There’s a small part of me that wishes I’d had something like Tinder when I was a 20-something. It would have helped me deal with my crippling nervousness about admitting that I fancied someone – and I’d certainly have got laid more often. But stuff like this makes me very glad I married before the rise of the dating app.

Imagine Tinder selling on this data, so people can target the “desirable elite”…