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A trade journal of a still-emerging field, written by Adam Tinworth.

Posts from the Video Category

Apple dropped some new kit this morning – a red iPhone, a better iPad (non-Pro), and some watch bands.

Oh, and a social video making app:

Apple today introduced Clips, a new app that makes it quick and fun for anyone to create expressive videos on iPhone® and iPad®. The app features a unique design for combining video clips, photos and music into great-looking videos to share with friends through the Messages app, or on Instagram, Facebook and other popular social networks.

One interesting touch for mojos on the go:

With Live Titles in Clips, users can add animated captions and titles using just their voice. Captions are generated automatically as a user speaks, and appear on screen perfectly synced with the user’s voice. Users can mix and match different styles, and tap any title to adjust text and punctuation, or even add inline emoji. Live Titles supports 36 different languages.

It’s not available to download quite yet – it will be out in April. But it looks like it could be a very handy tools for journalists working on social video quickly from the field. Look for a full review next month.

A prominent YouTuber has lost a lucrative contract:

Since August, PewDiePie has posted nine videos that include anti-Semitic jokes or Nazi imagery, according to a review of his channel by The Wall Street Journal.

On Monday after the Journal contacted Disney about the videos, the entertainment giant said it was severing ties with Mr. Kjellberg, who as PewDiePie rose to prominence via clips of himself playing videogames or performing skits and making crude jokes.

What’s interesting about this is that a single YouTuber has reached enough prominence that their deals with major corporations warrant the attention of the Wall Street Journal.

Significant enough, in fact, that they pushed out out as a notification:

PewDiePie WSJ push notification

YouTubers are still a massively under-discussed part of the modern media business landscape.

Are you now, or have you ever been, a Viner? In which case, you need to act sharpish, to rescue access to your content. Vine as we know it dies on January 17th, and you only have until then to download your content:

And last but not least, you can now download your Vines through the app or the website. All of your Vines will continue to live on the vine.co website so you can browse all of the amazing videos you created over the years.

Nothing’s being deleted, but if you want access to the original video files, the clock is ticking

Vine - download your files

The Vine app itself is becoming a looping video camera for Twitter:

Here’s what’s coming: in January, we’re transitioning the Vine app to a pared-down Vine Camera. With this camera app you’ll still be able to make six-second looping videos, and either post them directly to Twitter or save them to your phone.

Oh, and Giphy has a handy tool for converting your Vines into Gifs

Blogosphere magazine has just revealed its latest cover star – the ubiquitous Zoella. The reveal video does give some surprising insights into the impact on her life of YouTube-driven celebrity. The idea of bus tours driving by your house is rather disturbing…

The Mail has got rather hot under the collar at the imagery, though:

But seven years after she first burst onto the scene, Zoella’s latest photo shoot, in which she lounges on a bed in just her underwear, is further evidence of the teen idol’s move towards an increasingly grown-up image.

YouTubers. Bless ’em. They grow up so fast.

Life after Vine:

The drumbeat of doom was such that most of the app’s biggest names, after attempting a remarkable shakedown, had long migrated to Snapchat, Twitter, YouTube, and such, mostly only using Vine now to advertise that exodus. Miel has followed suit, to a degree, but worries that the appeal won’t transfer — her appeal, or the medium’s. Vine was never quite as craven — or quite as specifically teenaged — as the media attention made it seem. It prized, and perfected, a very specific and impressively bizarre and wholly universal thing.

Interesting insight into the rise and path to survival of the Vine celebs, even as the platform that birthed them dies.

Jessica Davies:

BuzzFeed’s shift to video is taking hold in its U.K. operations. The digital media company is doubling the size of its London office so it can house two new studios with a particular focus on sponsor video.

The goal: to bring all video production made on behalf of U.K. advertisers in-house.

So, it’s all ads rather than editorial video – but it’s a telling sign of how important video is becoming to monetising content. And another step in Buzzfeed’s shift towards video.

Silvia Killingsworth on Instagram ads:

Today I was fed a full commercial from Karlie Kloss, which was amazing because it was just a fully produced video ad like the ones you used to see on television when you used to watch live television.

And it is:

Yup, that’s a full-on TV advert. And it’s been commissioned and shot for play on Instagram.

It seems that social networks are becoming the new TV. And in that light the latest “Twitter for sale” rumour makes sense:

Walt Disney Co. is working with a financial adviser to evaluate a possible bid for Twitter Inc., according to people familiar with the matter.

Now streaming on Twitter

Why? Because Twitter is quietly becoming a video company. Mathew Ingram:

With its resources, Disney would be able to help Twitter improve its video streaming and possibly strike new deals with other content providers. As a result of a recent acquisition, Disney owns a stake in BAMTech, the digital arm of Major League Baseball, which runs streaming services for ESPN and others, including Twitter.

As John Gruber put it:

Twitter is a media company and a publishing service, not a social network.

Increasingly I wonder exactly what is a social network in 2016. Snapchat and WhatsApp are less social networks than communication tools. Instagram is a picture sharing service with comms element. Twitter is a publishing platform. Does that just leave Facebook?

Not everyone is certain about Disney making a good partner for Twitter, though:

But if you’re going to spend $18 billion, $20 billion, $30 billion on something, you need a little bit more than “I like the dude who runs the company.”

Bear in mind that Disney acquired Marvel AND Lucasfilm AND Pixar, for $15 billion. Is Twitter really worth as much to it as those three properties put together?