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A trade journal of a still-emerging field, written by Adam Tinworth.

Posts from the Video Category

What happens when you have a video go seriously viral?

A media frenzy ensued and ultimately Kim’s video was seen by tens of millions of people around the world. A slew of news organisations sought Kim’s permission to use the footage, many of them offering money for an exclusive deal. She signed a contract with one of them, a company called ViralHog. That agreement meant that Kim was no longer deluged with direct requests for the footage – ViralHog took on the job of fielding them. It also earned Kim “tens of thousands” of dollars, she says.

Ethics get steamrollered by reality: someone will make money off the video – it might as well be the person who recorded it. But they need assistance to do so.

If you’re into mobile journalism – and you probably should be – this kickstarter is worth backing:

To be clear, it’s already at three times over its target – and will probably hit four times before its done. But its a chance to get your hands on useful device pretty early.

I’ve been using the original Glif for a couple of years ago, and it is a super simple way of getting a phone onto a tripod, hugely boosting the quality of the video you can shoot. The new version is both easier to use – and more versatile. I can’t wait to get my hands on it.

Back the new Glif on Kickstarter – but you’ve only got four days to do so…

Here’s another example of a serious documentary being shot on an iPhone:

The thing that baffles me about this – or, at least, which isn’t made clear in the video – is why, once you go to the hassle of shooting with huge cinema lenses, would you add to your hassle by using an iPhone as your capture device, rather than an actual video camera?

There’s clearly more to this story than explained here.

Anyway, here’s the full documentary for your enjoyment:

[via MacStories]

Vertical Video barbarism infects the Washington Post

On Monday, the Post published a minute-long vertical video about the importance of Super Tuesday, which was told with animated graphics and meant to be watched with the sound off. The video, produced by politics video editor Sarah Parnass, is the latest in a series of “Know Its,” the Post’s name for its vertical video explainers.

Much as it pains me, vertical video is here to stay. It’s another consequence of the mobile shift.

Flash’s days are coming to an end

The Global Media Format Report 2016 from Encoding.com predicts that the Flash video codec — which the late Steve Jobs despised — will pretty much vanish within 24 months. While Flash is still being used for specific uses and edge cases such as banner ads and legacy browsers, it’s days are numbered, according to the cloud media processing service.

I haven’t had Flash installed on my MacBook Pro for over a year now, and only occasionally miss it. The big offender is the BBC, which still tries to serve me Flash, unless I have Safari pretend to be an iPad, in which case the video plays fine. What I don’t (and won’t) miss is the battery drain Flash brings.

(Remember when the “iPhone would fail because it didn’t have Flash?”)