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A trade journal of a still-emerging field, written by Adam Tinworth.

Posts tagged bloggers

Ah, Media Twitter is all aflutter with this news from the New York Times:

The Gateway Pundit, a provocative conservative blog, gained notice last year for its fervent pro-Trump coverage and its penchant for promoting false rumors about voter fraud and Hillary Clinton’s health that rocketed around right-wing websites.

Now the site will report on politics from a prominent perch: the White House.

And they certainly seem pleased about it:

Heavens-to-Betsy, a blogger in the press room? There will be a predictable backlash from journalists (in fact there probably already is one), who will do some eye-rolling at the infiltration of the true journalists’ space. And they will all have forgotten this:

Bloggers and pundits have been granted access to White House briefings in previous administrations

The use of the word “blog” here is pretty arbitrary. The definition of “blog” and “website” are pretty hazy at the best of times and the past five years have only blurred that. (Remember when people were calling Buzzfeed and Huffington Post blogs?)

Gateway Pudit itself has a little fun with that distinction:

The New York Times, a provocative liberal blog

The concern here isn’t that the White House has granted press credentials to a Pro-Trump Blog, but that it has granted them to a Pro-Trump blog. But even that shouldn’t necessarily be of deep concern, because we have so much partisan press already (especially in the UK).

The pundit/propagandist boundary

When should we worry? Well, look at the outlet’s record for truth – if it’s so pro-Trump that it lies for the president, than it’s crossed that hazy line from partisan journalism to straight-up propaganda. And on that charge, they have some form:

The Gateway Pundit did not see protesters getting on or off the bus, and they offered no proof that any protesters had been paid (by George Soros or anyone else). The web site published three pictures of buses and then fabricated a story about paid protesters based on the mistaken observations of a sole Twitter user.

The Washington Post, a blog owned by tech mogul Jeff Bezos, has many more examples for you:

Just last week, the Gateway Pundit published the absurd, social media-generated claim that the Washington Post’s Doris Truong had sneakily snapped cellphone photos of notes belonging to secretary of state nominee Rex Tillerson, during his confirmation hearing. Truong was not at the hearing; it made no sense to think she would have been at the hearing, since she is an editor of The Post’s website.

In some parts of the world, blogging is still very much a revolutionary activity:

Pakistani blogger Aasim Saeed who went missing earlier this month has been found but has quickly left the country fearing for his life, his family said on Sunday. Saeed’s father said his son was detained by “state agencies” while visiting Pakistan from Singapore, though he did not name which one. Pakistan’s government and Federal Investigation Agency have denied holding any of five liberal activists who went missing this month.

He, at least, is alive and visible. There are questions about others:

Five liberal activists, some of whom have posted blogs criticising the political influence of the military and speaking for the rights of religious minorities, had each gone missing separately since Jan. 4.

Josh t

Bloomberg has a new hire:

Josh Topolsky, the co-founder of the technology website The Verge, will join Bloomberg as the editor of a series of online ventures it is introducing as part of a revamped journalism strategy.

He’ll be running a range of new online initiatives for them as “Editor of Bloomberg Digital, and Bloomberg Media’s Chief Digital Content Officer”.

Interesting to see people who have risen through the “blog” ranks of online media transitioning into senior positions in more traditional publishers…

Flossie's foodRather luxuriously, this family holiday I’m on with the extended Tinworth clan is been catered for by a cook. The food has been waistline-challengingly delicious, and has led to most mealtimes being accompanied by Hazel’s happy food sounds, and she enthusiastically wolfs down her courgette salad, or mini French bread pizza, or similar. 

As it turns out, the rather talented young lady keeping us all well fed is also a food blogger: Flossie of Food from Flossie.

Bloggers. They get everywhere, I tell you. Deliciously.

PandoDaily’s David Holmes on Andrew Sullivan’s new paywall:

Andrew Sullivan isn’t some pajama-clad mouth-breather toiling away in his mother’s basement. He’s an industry veteran who edited The New Republic before the word “blog” even existed.

David, 2003 called – it wants its anti-blogger insults back. Somehow Sarah Lacy has found the world’s last person who believes in that stereotype, and allows him to write on her blog. The irony is somewhat tasty. 

Incidentally, I signed up for The Dish‘s paywall immediately. Sullivan’s blogging has been an inspiration to me for over a decade.

Superman stands up for journalism...Tomorrow, newspaper journalism loses another icon. Clark Kent, well-known reporter on that famous Metropolis organ The Daily Planet quits, to go into online journalism

That’s right, Superman is getting out of print journalism, and he’s not the only great icon of comics to leave the business. Two years ago, Marvel moved that great newsman J. Jonah Jameson (of Amazing Spider-Man fame) into politics, to keep him relevant…

Superman writer Scott Lobell had this to say:

“I don’t think [Clark Kent]’s going to be filling out an application anywhere,” the writer says. “He is more likely to start the next Huffington Post or the next Drudge Report than he is to go find someone else to get assignments or draw a paycheck from.”

You mean… Superman is about to become a blogger? The horror! The horror!

It’s something when the comic book industry (widely available to read on your tablet, via Comixology-based apps…) are writing the eulogy for your industry. 

[via Romenesko]