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A trade journal of a still-emerging field, written by Adam Tinworth.

Posts tagged creators

It’s not hard to find this adorable:

Yes, it’s the CGI team from Industrial Light & Magic, watching reaction videos to the trailer for Rogue One, the forthcoming Star Wars movie.

In a month where we’ve seen so damn many examples of the negative impact of social media, it’s nice to see a more positive one. And while, yes, this is marketing, it’s also an example of communication. Fans of Star Wars who have gone into professional filming are reacting to the reactions of fans who makes YouTube videos. It’s sort of a meta-reaction video.

The circle is now complete

More than that, it’s a circle of communication between the creators and their audience that allows a degree of interplay. We’ve reached an interesting point in our culture where fans of the media of the 70s and 80s are now professionals in their own right, and able to bring both their fandom and their skills to bear on old franchises. The revival of Doctor Who under the acclaimed Russell T. Davies (a Who uber-fan) a decade ago is a classic example of that. At leat two of the lead actors – David Tennant and Peter Capaldi – are fans, too. The rebirth of the Star Wars franchise last year is another example.

However, there’s a really careful line to walk between being a fan and being a professional. You don’t just want to make something for the fans – you want to make it for everybody. But equally, you need to understand what it was about these narratives that made people fans in the first place. And it’s easy within your fannish professional bubble to make the wrong calls. At least here we’re seeing people take some form of sanity check on their own work.

Well, as long as they’re also watching the negative reactions…

[via The Mary Sue]

Compelling exploration of how creative minds function:

As psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, who has interviewed creative people across various fields points out, creative people “show tendencies of thought and action that in most people are segregated. They contain contradictory extremes; instead of being an “individual,” each of them is a “multitude.”

The ability to switch between apparently contradictory modes of thinking is key. Fascinating.

Lurking around in my browser tabs:

  • On Makers and Managers – good look at the tension between these two roles that should be familiar to most people in journalism
  • The Death of Tag Clouds – this has been creating some debate internally at RBI. I still like ’em, but I never thought they were a navigation tool, just a visual means of displaying the “aboutness” of the site.
  • Why Tumblr is Kicking Posterous’ Ass – insightful post on the difference between an engineered website and a designed one.
  • Jeff Jarvis’s Cockeyed Economics – some good economic theory around paid content in here
  • The Value of Blogging – anyone familiar with my job title knows that I’m contractually obligated to value blogging as a journalistic endeavour – but this post enumerates some of the reasons well.
  • Posterous, the iPhone and Microjournalism – great account of using the iPhone and Posterous to report from abroad using a mobile device. 
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CMS Wire has picked up on Gartner’s new classification of online community participants. It’s still essentially the 80/20 rule, but the 20 are broken down into three groups:

Gartner: Community Participants
Interesting how small they still perceive the creator part being. This suggests to me that there’s still a role for the professional, in creating genuine original content which people congregate around. But it’s worth journalists remembering that a “3 in 100” creator proportion suggests that there’s a whole lot more competition for attention than the “1 to several thousand” print era…