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A trade journal of a still-emerging field, written by Adam Tinworth.

Posts tagged #mojo

Apple dropped some new kit this morning – a red iPhone, a better iPad (non-Pro), and some watch bands.

Oh, and a social video making app:

Apple today introduced Clips, a new app that makes it quick and fun for anyone to create expressive videos on iPhone® and iPad®. The app features a unique design for combining video clips, photos and music into great-looking videos to share with friends through the Messages app, or on Instagram, Facebook and other popular social networks.

One interesting touch for mojos on the go:

With Live Titles in Clips, users can add animated captions and titles using just their voice. Captions are generated automatically as a user speaks, and appear on screen perfectly synced with the user’s voice. Users can mix and match different styles, and tap any title to adjust text and punctuation, or even add inline emoji. Live Titles supports 36 different languages.

It’s not available to download quite yet – it will be out in April. But it looks like it could be a very handy tools for journalists working on social video quickly from the field. Look for a full review next month.

Caroline Scott finds that mojo has some unexpected dangers in war zones from an interview with Nick Garnett of BBC 5Live:

“For years I have been extolling the virtues of small, hand-held devices, on the basis that they are non-intrusive, but here we have a situation where that could cause you more grief – frankly, you’re holding a device that looks like a gun.”

Garnett explained that as the country is very militarised, with guns part and parcel of everyday life, everything with a pistol grip, such as a gimbal, can look like a weapon from 100 metres away through the barrel of a sniper.

Very big, very obvious kit clearly still has its place.

If you’re into mobile journalism – and you probably should be – this kickstarter is worth backing:

To be clear, it’s already at three times over its target – and will probably hit four times before its done. But its a chance to get your hands on useful device pretty early.

I’ve been using the original Glif for a couple of years ago, and it is a super simple way of getting a phone onto a tripod, hugely boosting the quality of the video you can shoot. The new version is both easier to use – and more versatile. I can’t wait to get my hands on it.

Back the new Glif on Kickstarter – but you’ve only got four days to do so…

Here’s another example of a serious documentary being shot on an iPhone:

The thing that baffles me about this – or, at least, which isn’t made clear in the video – is why, once you go to the hassle of shooting with huge cinema lenses, would you add to your hassle by using an iPhone as your capture device, rather than an actual video camera?

There’s clearly more to this story than explained here.

Anyway, here’s the full documentary for your enjoyment:

[via MacStories]